It's a Boy!: Your Son's Development from Birth to discount Age new arrival 18 outlet online sale

It's a Boy!: Your Son's Development from Birth to discount Age new arrival 18 outlet online sale

It's a Boy!: Your Son's Development from Birth to discount Age new arrival 18 outlet online sale
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Product Description

It’s a Boy! provides expert advice on the developmental, psychological, social, emotional, and academic life of boys from infancy through the teen years. Exploring the many ways in which boys strive for masculinity and attempt to define themselves, psychologist Michael Thompson, Ph.D., a leading international expert on boys’ development, and journalist Teresa H. Barker identify the key developmental transitions that mark a boy’s psychological growth and emotional health, and the challenges both boys and parents face at each age.

Baby Boys (birth to 18 months): falling in love with your son, healthy attachment, trust, and temperament
Toddler Years (18 months to 3 years): boys on the go, bold steps, blankies, budding language, and rambunctious physicality
Powerful Little Boys (ages 3 and 4): superhero ambitions, learning to manage the force of his anger, and celebrating the power of the boy group
Starting School (ages 5 through 7): developmental cues for school readiness, transitional challenges, tough talk, tender hearts, and first friends
Boys on a Mission (ages 8 through 10): striving for mastery in sports, organizing the boy brain for school success, and glaring academic gender gaps
The Preteen (ages 11 through 13): puberty, posturing, and popularity, the culture of cruelty, and stoic silence in the middle school years
Early High School (ages 14 and 15): powerful peer groups, sexuality, the shift away from Mom, and yearning for Dad’s respect and attention
On the Brink of Manhood (ages 16 through 18): the quest for independence, sex, love, driving, drinking, and other challenges of life

Practical, insightful, and engaging, It’s a Boy! is the definitive guide to raising boys in today’s world, revealing with humor, compassion, and joy all the infinite varieties of boys and the profound ways in which we love them.

Review

“It’s a Boy! is a powerful guide to raising a son in today’s world. Filled with stories from the front lines and practical advice, it is gentle and compassionate, yet also moving and beautiful. The heart of a boy beats in every page.”—Michael Gurian, author of The Wonder of Boys

“I’m keeping It''s a Boy! beside my bed until my sons go to college! I love how the book celebrates boys but still holds them responsible for their actions.” —Rosalind Wiseman, author of Queen Bees and Wannabes

“Michael Thompson has gradually earned his place as the Warren Buffett of child rearing, the real deal. His track record of uncanny timing, his hard-won knowledge, common sense, and humanism have resonated with parents everywhere. Now there is a desperate need to understand our boys more deeply; there is a palpable hunger to learn how to handle our sons better. It’s a Boy! does both in a way not seen before. It’s a Boy! will help your son to feel more loved, understood, and effectively guided by you–forever.”—Ron Taffel, Ph.D., author of Parenting by Heart: How to Stay Connected to Your Child in a Disconnected World

“Spectacular . . . extraordinary insight, enriched by countless poignant and telling stories of boys and their parents and teachers. It’s a Boy! is an immensely helpful navigational chart for steering through the shoals of a boy’s developmental stages.”—Patrick F. Bassett, president, National Association of Independent Schools

“Wise, sensible, accessible, useful–this is the must-have book every parent of a boy will want and need to turn to as their child grows from a baby to an adolescent. Illuminated by Thompson’s years of experience working with boys and their families, this book is chock-full of new insights and the latest science about the ages and stages of boys’ development. It’s a Boy! is a book that parents, educators, health professionals, and policy makers will go back to again and again and each time come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of why ‘boys will be boys.’”—Robie H. Harris, author of It’s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health

“Bringing together the latest research and the most timeless knowledge and wisdom, this monumental book is unique, invaluable, and urgently important. Any person who cares about boys must own this book, as it addresses every relevant question and provides not only authoritative answers but also comfort, warmth, enthusiasm, and spark. What a truly amazing achievement, what a gift Dr. Thompson has given us all.”—Edward M. Hallowell, M.D., author of Delivered from Distraction: Getting the Most Out of Life with Attention Deficit Disorder

About the Author

Michael Thompson, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist, lecturer, consultant, and former seventh-grade teacher. He conducts workshops across the United States and internationally on social cruelty, children’s friendships, and boys’ development. With Dan Kindlon, Ph.D., he co-authored the New York Times bestseller Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys, which was adapted into an acclaimed documentary shown on PBS. With Teresa H. Barker he co-authored The Pressured Child: Helping Your Child Find Success in School and Life and Speaking of Boys: Answers to the Most-Asked Questions About Raising Sons. With Catherine O’Neill Grace and Lawrence J. Cohen, Ph.D., he co-authored Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children and Mom, They’re Teasing Me: Helping Your Child Solve Social Problems. Dr. Thompson is married and the father of two. He lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and can be reached at www.michaelthompson-phd.com.

Teresa Barker, who collaborated with Michael Thompson on Raising Cain, Speaking of Boys, and The Pressured Child, is a journalist whose other book collaborations include Girls Will Be Girls, The Soul of Money, and In the Moment. Barker is married and the mother of a son and two daughters. She lives in Portland, Oregon.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One


IMAGINING A BOY

What Were You Thinking?

ANDREW’S PARENTS ARE GRAPPLING WITH THE ISSUES that occupy the mind of every loving parent. They aren’t sure how to strike a healthy balance in their son’s life between sports and academics, music and video games, friends and family time. Should they let him watch TV before he cleans up his room? When should they stand firm and when should they let their son decide for himself? They agree it’s too early to think about college. But while they don’t want to pressure him about eventual career choices, the family business does have his name on it. “We’ll just take a wait-and-see approach,” his mother says gamely as she pats her very pregnant belly. It is two weeks before Andrew’s due date. As for Andrew, he mostly busies himself making wide turns in utero, the bulge of his tiny foot tracing an impressive arc across his mother’s midriff.

Perhaps you, too, are expecting a boy. And if he is your first child or the first boy in your growing family, your curiosity and concerns about a boy’s life fill your thoughts and conversations. You have heard other mothers say, “They really are different!” And, of course, they are. If they weren’t, there would be no point at all in my writing this book. “Boys are easier than girls,” you hear. “Boys are an open book.” “Boys love their mothers.” But then what do you make of all those stories about boys being uncommunicative, behaving badly or struggling through school, stifling their inner life or losing themselves on the way to becoming men?

If this is your first foray into the intimate life of boys, you may be excited or nervous at the prospect. If you already have a son, or you had brothers, or you are a dad and remember your own boyhood, then your outlook on parenting a boy may have you feeling all the more confident and encouraged—or wary, bracing for the worst.

Perhaps you are the mother of a five-year-old boy and you are feeling a bit edgy about his interests. “My son really likes to play with guns,” one mother told me. “I don’t like them and I won’t allow them in the house, so one day at breakfast he made a gun with his finger and his thumb and he ‘shot’ his brother with it! Why does he keep doing that?”

If you are that mother, you may be worried that, despite your great love for your son and the good home in which he is being raised, his interest in guns is a sign that he’s going to grow up to be violent and dangerous. That’s an uncomfortable feeling.

Perhaps you are the mother of a two-year-old and your little boy is suddenly beginning to seem different to you. He is starting to disobey you, to look right at you when he breaks a rule or touches something he’s not supposed to touch. He laughs gleefully when you scold him. He seems so willful and defiant. Is that normal?

Or perhaps you are the mother of an older boy who has begun to pull away from you into a boys-only world that is clearly off-limits to moms. The goodnight chats are getting shorter and details of his day less forthcoming. You’ve heard that happens with boys, but you and your son have been so close—surely not him, not yet!

If you are a dad, perhaps you are not too proud to admit that you are a bit nervous about raising a boy, even though you were a boy yourself and you should, theoretically, know all about it. Maybe you had a hard time as a boy or have mixed feelings about your father, and you want it to be different for your son. Or perhaps you were a lucky boy and a lucky man, an enthusiastic dad who wants to get it right for your son. If you are a dad or father-to-be and you are making this effort to deepen your understanding about the life of boys, then your son is already a lucky boy, too.



Once you accept the miracle of a child coming into your life, once you embrace the humbling journey that parenting is for all of us, the question that drives nearly every conversation about boys, whether you are expecting your first or you have a houseful of them, is: What makes boys tick?

Development is the fundamental engine of a child’s growth, the ongoing process in which nature, nurture, and sheer luck come together and a unique human being emerges. The biological story of growth and advice about prenatal health and the day-to-day care and feeding of infants and children are well covered in general parenting literature and medical checkups. We’re here to focus on the psychological development of boys, the inside story of how a boy’s inner life takes shape and progresses through infancy, childhood, and adolescence. It’s a process that isn’t always easy to see or understand, not because boys intentionally hide it (though they attempt to do so at times) but because they show it in ways that adults don’t always recognize. But it’s all there. In everyday life with boys they are always onstage, showing us what’s new. Against that developmental backdrop, in the chapters ahead we’ll examine the key issues of psychological development that dominate each stage because that is, for you and your son, where the greatest challenges and drama of childhood—and parenting—play out.

If pregnancy and parenthood have left you much time to think, you are full of expectations and wonderings about your boy. You are imagining your son as he will be in six months or two years or twenty years. You may be reading a lot of parenting literature and hearing advice from family, friends, and total strangers. And every day in the news there is another research finding about child or adolescent brain science and gender differences, but very little on their actual relevance to raising your son. How do you turn all that into intelligent, intuitive parenting for raising a boy? How do you begin to answer the two most important questions for the next eighteen years: What do boys need? What is my son going to need from me?

Those are questions we’ll address in the pages ahead, but before we do that, let’s look back to the time when your thoughts about boys first took shape long ago.



You may feel newly called to this deep exploration of the inner life of boys, but I want to suggest the surprising idea that you have been thinking about what makes boys tick all of your life, or almost all of it. Thinking about having a baby someday—and imagining that baby as a boy or a girl—is one of the most basic of all human thoughts. It starts early in life. As soon as they can talk and engage in imaginary play, children—boys as well as girls—begin to enact the role of parent, first by themselves and then alongside other children, imitating the actions of the mothers and fathers they love and watch intently every day.

Most of us don’t remember what we played when we were three or four years old. That is why I want to remind you that you almost certainly did engage in some version of this domestic role-playing game, taking the role of a mom or dad, rocking a baby doll (or, if you were a boy, perhaps dismantling it or making it fly like a superhero or roll in the mud), and holding forth on what boys like and girls prefer. You “played doctor,” asking bold, uncensored questions about body parts, making mental notes. You continued as a child to school yourself in a child’s everyday version of gender studies, offering your expertise to any parent, teacher, or other child whom you felt was short on insight. From the age of five, when her younger brother arrived, my daughter, Joanna, objected to anything we did for our son, Will, that didn’t seem properly masculine to her. “Mom, that’s not for boys,” she would declare about a toy or an outfit that was too androgynous to pass her gender test. She was afraid that we wouldn’t raise our son in the right way.

In school, if you were a girl, you may remember complaining to a teacher about a bothersome boy—the noisy, pesky, clumsy, or fidgety boy, the boy who bugged you to distraction. Or you might recall disliking boys in a group, especially when they chased you and your friends on the playground or, perhaps in your teens, when you found them aggravating or baffling for different reasons.

If you were a boy, you remember how it felt to posture (or try to) around girls. You may have refused to play a game or do something someone suggested, protesting loudly, “That’s for girls!” or “We don’t want to be in reading groups with girls,” a solid declaration of what eight-year-old boys like and what they hate.

These childhood examples of how we came to know boys or imagine boys’ needs or wants may seem far removed from the adult reality of parenting a boy. They are not. Our childhood experiences form a huge reservoir of memories, thoughts, dreams, and feelings, many of them unconscious, that we bring to bear in parenting our own child. Whether we remember those moments or not, we have been coming to conclusions about boys our entire lives, and as a result, we have some pretty strong opinions—I call them imaginings—about what boys will be like, how easy or hard they are to raise, or what they might need as they grow up.

In the thirteenth century, Vincent of Beauvais, author of the Speculum Maius, the great encyclopedia of the Middle Ages, observed, “Woman is man’s confusion.” It seems to me that the obverse is also true: man—and thus boy—is woman’s confusion. So, along with the general activity and demands of parenting a boy, mothers face that formidable gender gap and the unique, ongoing challenges and sweet rewards that come with it. And what about fathers, with the home advantage of gender affinity? Any honest father will admit that gender familiarity breeds its own kind of challenges and rewards—and sometimes no less confusion.

The sex of your child, then, is going to pull all of this out of you: your history as a male or female, your experience, your likes and dislikes. It will draw on your deepest feelings about your father, your brother, and, if you are a mother, everything that has ever gone on with your husband. The fact that your child is a boy is going to shape your life and change your psychology forever—and not just the way you feel about boys. Brain research shows that raising children shapes the way you think—neurologically—about them, too. Hormones and mirror neurons develop a sensitive biochemical circuitry that creates new connections and pathways in response to experience. We don’t just experience parenthood; parenthood shapes all of our experiences. With this brain-mind-body linkage in place, and imaginings already in progress, it doesn’t take much to push the “boy button” in your psyche and set all your personal preformed “boy” psychology into motion.



Once you’ve got a baby on the way, the simplest question in the world— Is it a boy or a girl?—is fraught with implications. The question can set off a flood of feelings about boys that may include some positive ones, a number that are unhappy, and some that are ambivalent. A woman whose father had died when she was young told me she felt “both pride and intense anxiety” when she found out she was having a boy:

I was raised, essentially, entirely by women in a family of women. . . . Men and boys always fascinated me, and I’ve always loved them, been fond of them—but they always seemed exotic, hairy, wild, noisy, unpredictable, with their big voices and big stories. Great fun, absolutely delightful—couldn’t do without them. But also a little scary. The thought that I had to parent one of these was very intimidating.

Another mom described the chorus of concerns the news triggered for her:

Panic mode! I had some anxiety about raising a male child myself. I am married to a wonderful man who is a terrific father, and it was not his capabilities I questioned, it was my own. “Old tape” is hard to stop replaying.

Each of us has “old tape” when it comes to boys, and parenting a boy— even just thinking about becoming the parent of a boy—pushes the play button. This mother felt she was “particularly sensitive to gender preference,” but parents who say they have no strong preference about gender are nonetheless full of feeling about it, full of imaginings, as these mothers share:

At first I was thrilled to learn I was having a boy, and then suddenly worried that he would have to go to war someday.

I was shocked. I thought it was a girl. A boy? A boy? What would I do with a boy?

I prayed for a son because I didn’t want to go through the terrible turmoil my mother and I had experienced, especially when I hit puberty. But I also always loved the idea of a boy. A boy seemed like a child I could roughhouse with more easily.

What if, for any of a number of reasons, the thought of having a boy was close to unimaginable for you? One mother recalled that when she found out she was carrying a boy, she felt “a little worried because boys seemed so much more boisterous than girls.” She also worried, she said, because “he would be an ‘other’ just by the very fact of him being a different sex than me. How would that be?”

Author Andrea Buchanan, in her introduction to a collection of essays by mothers of sons, wrote, “Long before I got pregnant, I began to fantasize about my imaginary daughter. I rarely imagined having a son. So a few weeks ago, when the ultrasound technician’s pointer indicated my unborn son’s rather obvious pointer, I was as shocked as I have ever been in my life.”

As shocked as I have ever been in my life—that’s saying a lot, and I think it speaks to the power of our expectations. How do you fall in love with someone, even a baby, who has so upset your expectations? How do you turn on a dime when your fantasies of the future have been so disrupted?

The mother of a young son, pregnant for a second time, cried when the prenatal test showed this child to be a boy: “I was saddened that I would never have a girl—a child in my likeness.” Another mother described her attitude adjustment: “I had my heart set on having a girl and I cried when I found out it was a boy. . . . But by the time he was born, I didn’t care one way or the other.”

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Maritza
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book has made a difference in our lives and I think my grandson will fair better than my nephews ever did because of it
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2018
If there every was a manual for raising a boy THIS IS IT! Thanks Doc. I always knew there was something about our boys that we weren''t "getting" and now that I have a grandson I just had to learn what it was.....I had a "finger on it" now I have a... See more
If there every was a manual for raising a boy THIS IS IT! Thanks Doc. I always knew there was something about our boys that we weren''t "getting" and now that I have a grandson I just had to learn what it was.....I had a "finger on it" now I have a "hand on it". I referred this book to many others because it is a must read if you have a boy in your home. This book has made a difference in our lives and I think my grandson will fair better than my nephews ever did because of it. My hope now is that our teachers read it.
5 people found this helpful
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Gavin Hudson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Insight into developmental stages and the road ahead for your son
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2017
''It''s A Boy'' is at once interesting, helpful and reassuring to any parent. It was written with the bias that the mother is the primary caregiver, which is not entirely the case in my household, where my wife and I both share that joy and responsibility. That foible aside, I... See more
''It''s A Boy'' is at once interesting, helpful and reassuring to any parent. It was written with the bias that the mother is the primary caregiver, which is not entirely the case in my household, where my wife and I both share that joy and responsibility. That foible aside, I feel that I have benefited from this book as a parent, and have already recommended it to fellow parents of boys. It''s not so much that what you learn in the book will blow your mind or be a completely novel insight into parenting a boy; it might, but chances are your experience with your son has taught you many of the lessons of this book already by now. The book offers some fresh insight into the average developmental processes for boys, which helps reassure you about the normal developmental process and also prepare you for what''s ahead.
4 people found this helpful
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SHELLER
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very helpful and insightful!
Reviewed in the United States on October 24, 2012
I really needed some insight into how little boys'' minds work. I have an almost 2 year old son and many of his behaviors I''m not used to since I wasn''t around boys much growing up. This book is very helpful in that it focuses on what boys need and want, how and why they... See more
I really needed some insight into how little boys'' minds work. I have an almost 2 year old son and many of his behaviors I''m not used to since I wasn''t around boys much growing up. This book is very helpful in that it focuses on what boys need and want, how and why they behave so much differently than girls, and how to better help them deal with different challenges and issues they may have as they grow up. It''s very insightful and has helped me to understand my toddler so much better and my husband also. I''m almost halfway through this book and already I love it and plan on using it as a guide for many years. I like that it is broken into different age groups and that there are other parents'' stories and comments throughout the book that I can relate to now and in the future. I feel that this book is a must have for parents, teachers, caretakers, and anyone who works with boys.
10 people found this helpful
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Evayne
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best mothering book I''ve read yet
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2011
I''m expecting a baby boy this October and want to be prepared. I honestly thought I was going to have a girl, so I am now busy rewiring my brain into "boy mode"! In "It''s a Boy!" you''re presented with facts and reassurance as well as great tips and techniques to... See more
I''m expecting a baby boy this October and want to be prepared. I honestly thought I was going to have a girl, so I am now busy rewiring my brain into "boy mode"!

In "It''s a Boy!" you''re presented with facts and reassurance as well as great tips and techniques to raise your son from birth to the age of 18. After reading this book, I feel like I have a much better idea of what to expect of my son (even though the author makes it very clear that each child is different from one another and that it''s most important to spend enough time with your son to get to know him) and how to tackle the task of motherhood together with my baby boy.

I especially enjoyed how much reassurance the author managed to give me in parenting and how much less intimidated I am by the idea of having a son now. He clearly states that boys, above gender, are individuals, and that if you take your time to get to know your son - his moods, his needs, his cues, and have understanding for how confusing it is to be a new human being on this planet, that he''ll love you and get attached to you without much struggle.

The book incorporates many quotes and stories from parents of boys and is a great compilation of parenting techniques and insight into your little man''s way of thinking at any age. Great buy that will help me for many years to come!
2 people found this helpful
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TetonMom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must-have for mothers of boys!
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2013
Great book for moms with boys! This book was recommended to me by one of my son''s teachers and I was so glad I bought it. Very helpful to read as a single mother of a boy without a father and also being without a father of my own. Helped me to understand my son better, the... See more
Great book for moms with boys! This book was recommended to me by one of my son''s teachers and I was so glad I bought it. Very helpful to read as a single mother of a boy without a father and also being without a father of my own. Helped me to understand my son better, the changes he was going through and what to expect in the future. It also discusses the differences in the ways that boys think vs the way girls do and also how those differences can play out in the classroom, at home and socially. (I wish every teacher had to read this before dealing with children.) Overall it''s a great book to have on hand for referencing in times you feel a little lost. I have lent mine out to a few mothers who felt the same about it. Definitely recommend!
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Carolyn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book for the new Nom and Dad
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2021
I bought this book to include with my baby shower gift to my granddaughter and her husband on the arrival of their first child.
I’m sure there is loads of helpful hints and guidance for these new parents.
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RainydayMP
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
1 Mom, 2 Sons, 0 Brothers and Lots of Questions Answered by This Book
Reviewed in the United States on May 16, 2012
I have to start by saying that I found this book on Amazon when I was searching for some understanding of my 7 and 10 year old sons - who are very different, and yet I still don''t always "get them". As a mom who never had a brother - I''ve often been a bit aloof with... See more
I have to start by saying that I found this book on Amazon when I was searching for some understanding of my 7 and 10 year old sons - who are very different, and yet I still don''t always "get them". As a mom who never had a brother - I''ve often been a bit aloof with understanding "is this normal" when it came to my son. So - not willing to spend the money on an unknown - I first went to the library and checked out this book. After one week of on-and-off reading, I was sold and purchased my very own copy of this book.

Not only does this book help understand "what is normal" for boys regarding physical, emotional, social and educational development - it also helps every mom who didn''t grow up with boys understand that boys aren''t anything like girls! Maybe that was a personal thing I had to realize on my own, but this book helped me understand how wonderfully different they really are. Rather than wondering why my son isn''t chatty or the friend-seeker that I thought he should be because of his age, I now understand that he is a well-adjusted boy. That has brought a great peace to my mind. Also, it easy highlights where the "red-flags" should be in all forms of development while also giving suggestions for the proper response. As an added bonus, I should also mention that this book has helped me understand my husband a bit better, too!

One last thing - I''m not an avid reader, so taking on a book this big seamed really daunting. However, the book is formatted in a way that makes it an easy read due to the age separation, the breakout sections that highlight the different types of development, and the relate-able stories and lessons learned from them. You don''t need to read it all at once, rather hang on to it and consult with it over the years. I will now buy this book for friends of mine who are expecting boys. The "what to expect" books are great for the first year and a half of life, but for boys, this is the must have for the remaining 17 years.
20 people found this helpful
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Annabelle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book will save my family.
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2011
My husband said our 11 year old will learn everything he needs to from his friends. With that said, I scoured the library for a book that could teach me about my son as he begins to grow into his toughest years. I checked this book out three times and decided it was one I... See more
My husband said our 11 year old will learn everything he needs to from his friends. With that said, I scoured the library for a book that could teach me about my son as he begins to grow into his toughest years. I checked this book out three times and decided it was one I have to own. Dr. Thompson has taught me (or rather, warned me) that my son is about to begin to push away from his mother, something I had no idea about. I am preparing for this push-back by working on and securing the relationship we have now.I thought all I had to do is teach about the birds and bees.

This book is next to my bed. I use it to review what I go through with my sons, and to preview what is ahead. This book doesn''t preach or tell you how to raise your child. It gives you the low-down of how boys work, think, and function. I have told every friend with a son(s), that they must own this book, too.
I feel armed for the next chapters of my sons lives. Very grateful.
6 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

J. Ballantyne
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worth reading
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 27, 2013
I found this book useful. My boys are nearly 3 years old. I read through from birth to 4 years old and found it interesting. It confirmed things I have already experienced and forewarns me about what may happen next. The experiences of others were useful in grounding the...See more
I found this book useful. My boys are nearly 3 years old. I read through from birth to 4 years old and found it interesting. It confirmed things I have already experienced and forewarns me about what may happen next. The experiences of others were useful in grounding the theory. Easy to read and a chance to laugh in recognition of some of the frustrating moments that I recognise in other people''s anecdotes. I will dip into it as my children get older.
I found this book useful. My boys are nearly 3 years old. I read through from birth to 4 years old and found it interesting. It confirmed things I have already experienced and forewarns me about what may happen next. The experiences of others were useful in grounding the theory. Easy to read and a chance to laugh in recognition of some of the frustrating moments that I recognise in other people''s anecdotes. I will dip into it as my children get older.
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sb
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
hardwork
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 23, 2014
Apparently, it''s quite hard work to read. Not as enjoyable as why French kids do as they are told. but interesting nonetheless
Apparently, it''s quite hard work to read. Not as enjoyable as why French kids do as they are told. but interesting nonetheless
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Ana G.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Útil
Reviewed in Mexico on July 6, 2021
El libro llegó en excelentes condiciones, leí la muestra gratuita de la versión de kindle antes de comprarlo y me gustó mucho. Estoy esperando a que mi bebé nazca y poder ir leyendo al respecto me da claridad y tranquilidad. Se los recomiendo.
El libro llegó en excelentes condiciones, leí la muestra gratuita de la versión de kindle antes de comprarlo y me gustó mucho. Estoy esperando a que mi bebé nazca y poder ir leyendo al respecto me da claridad y tranquilidad. Se los recomiendo.
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P. Seipel
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Praktischer Ratgeber für Eltern
Reviewed in Germany on December 28, 2014
Haben diese Buch für einen Bekannten gekauft, welcher Nachwuchs bekommen hat. Hoffen ihm damit Tipps geschenkt zu haben mit welchen er es versteht das Erwachsenwerden seines Sohns besser zu meistern. Er hat sich auf jeden Fall sehr darüber gefreut.
Haben diese Buch für einen Bekannten gekauft, welcher Nachwuchs bekommen hat. Hoffen ihm damit Tipps geschenkt zu haben mit welchen er es versteht das Erwachsenwerden seines Sohns besser zu meistern. Er hat sich auf jeden Fall sehr darüber gefreut.
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Ilovetoread
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Helpful and clear
Reviewed in Australia on December 8, 2017
Some really clear, helpful tips of the ages and stages of boys.
Some really clear, helpful tips of the ages and stages of boys.
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