Crossing Boundaries and Weaving Intercultural Work, Life, and Scholarship popular in Globalizing Universities (Routledge Research in Higher discount Education) outlet sale

Crossing Boundaries and Weaving Intercultural Work, Life, and Scholarship popular in Globalizing Universities (Routledge Research in Higher discount Education) outlet sale

Crossing Boundaries and Weaving Intercultural Work, Life, and Scholarship popular in Globalizing Universities (Routledge Research in Higher discount Education) outlet sale
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This book generates a fresh, complex view of the process of globalization by examining how work, scholarship, and life inform each other among intercultural scholars as they navigate their interpersonal relationships and cross boundaries physically and metaphorically. Divided into three parts, the book examines: (1) the socio-psychological process of crossing boundaries constructed around nations and work organizations; (2) the negotiation of multiple aspects of identities; and (3) the role of language in intercultural encounters, in particular, adjustment taking place at linguistic and interactional levels. The authors reflect upon and give meaning and structure to their own intercultural experiences through theoretical frameworks and concepts―many of which they themselves have proposed and developed in their own research. They also provide invaluable advice for transnational scholars and those who aspire to work and live abroad to improve organizational participation and mutual intercultural engagement when working in a globalizing workplace. Researchers and practitioners of applied linguistics, communication studies, and higher education in many regions of the world will find this book an insightful resource.

Review

"Komisarof, Zhu Hua, and their contributors avoid the politically correct self-absorption that too often accompanies explorations of cultural identity, instead showing us how various concepts of cultural adaptation can bring meaning to the profoundly liminal experience of becoming intercultural."

Milton J. Bennett, Executive Director, Intercultural Development Research Institute, US

"This book provides fascinating accounts of the complex challenges and opportunities for growth that living and working in a different environment generate. It offers highly reflexive accounts of lived experiences in combination with theoretical frameworks that can help to illuminate and, ultimately, facilitate dialogue and understanding as a precondition for greater inclusivity."

Karin, Zotzmann, Language and Intercultural Communication

About the Author

Adam Komisarof is Professor of Intercultural Communication and Acculturation in Reitaku University''s Department of Economic Studies and Business Administration in Chiba Prefecture, Japan.

Zhu Hua is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Communication and Head of Department at Birkbeck College, University of London, UK.

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5 out of 55 out of 5
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Top review from the United States

George F. Simons
5.0 out of 5 stars
An antidote to cultural labeling
Reviewed in the United States on May 9, 2016
The topic of intercultural studies in academia cannot be broached without awareness of the unsettling changes and resource challenges of higher education in today’s globalizing context. Shrinking budgets, the massive influx of international students, and the shift of focus... See more
The topic of intercultural studies in academia cannot be broached without awareness of the unsettling changes and resource challenges of higher education in today’s globalizing context. Shrinking budgets, the massive influx of international students, and the shift of focus from preoccupation with liberal learning to that of hands-on acquisition of competence all have a bearing on why I pick up a book like this, even though I am an occasional university lecturer rather than a full-time professor. My everyday experience is interrupted by frequent absence, while at the same time I sense that it gives me a helicopter perspective of the kind that an expatriate tends to acquire of her or his homeland.

At the start, Crossing Boundaries offers a quick but incisive overview of four types of approaches to the elusive (overused and abused) concept of culture. Rather than choosing to be eclectic, the Introduction examines the relevance and functionality of each as circumstances may dictate. The editors’ choice of a methodology based on auto-ethnography, treats the diverse slate of contributors as both researchers and subjects of the research. There are three perspectives emphasized in the experiences recounted: acculturation dynamics, identity negotiation, and language in live interactions, all of which are set in the context of working in the academic environment of a culture not one’s own. These themes structure the three parts of the book in which each contributor attempts to present, and interpret, then discuss their experience and share the perspectives derived. Inevitably these three perspectives will somewhat overlap in the accounts. Author profiles at the conclusion of each contribution can easily be consulted as framework for the understanding of its biographical context. It was particularly refreshing to find a wholesome gender balance in the selection of contributors.

The usefulness of the auto-ethnographic approach emerges when we realize that in unsettled times, “culture plays a more pronounced role and ideology guides people’s behavior.” Despite growing awareness among interculturalists of the dangers of essentialism, it is also critical to remember that social uncertainties reinforce the search for solid unquestionable identities for one’s self and the temptation to find simple labels for the others. We become desperate to create certainties, “brands” to believe in and act on. The stories in this book acknowledge this dynamic while validating the importance of recognizing its contextual relativity. The auto-ethnographic approach is an antidote to “hijacking cultural discourse” by using culture to explain everything a person says or does.

Thus the richness of this read lies in its narrative approach to cultural experience in academia. This also makes interpretation, for the editors as well as the reader, truly challenging. Notes and academic references point to resources used in each account for the interpretations in the text. Komisarof’s own story of acculturation to a Japanese academic context leads off the string of accounts as he describes the development of an acculturation framework consisting of several profiles involving differing levels of acceptance that can be experienced in various contexts. In each, he explores the behaviors which either facilitate or impede acceptance.

Though the authors take pains to describe the pains surrounding cultural misfit, the methodology is not about taking offense at cultural misunderstanding but learning its dynamics. Appropriately the book closes with practical insights into exploring liminal situations and exploiting constructive marginality, both personally (as do the contributors to the volume) and institutionally. Certainly this is a way to detour around the all-too-intense, often self-righteousness judgments of political correctness and the impediments they put in the way of culturally sensitive connections and taint training and learning efforts.

The importance of finding and using social support in both life and work found in immigrant career development and psychological adjustment is highlighted in several of the accounts. In academia the presence of successful foreign professors, for example, can in turn offer role models for students coming from abroad.

While Crossing Boundaries is focused on globalizing universities, it becomes obvious to the reader that the application of the methodology extends to intercultural work in all kinds of organizational and social environments. The book makes clear that having a solid methodology for telling our stories is clearly of major importance in creating the perspectives that will enable us to bunk down together on spaceship earth.
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Crossing Boundaries and Weaving Intercultural Work, Life, and Scholarship popular in Globalizing Universities (Routledge Research in Higher discount Education) outlet sale

Crossing Boundaries and Weaving Intercultural Work, Life, and Scholarship popular in Globalizing Universities (Routledge Research in Higher discount Education) outlet sale